Power BI Glossary in plain English

Power BI Glossary is a one line description of relevant terms. Jargon free and easy to assimilate. This is actually part of the Power BI Udemy course I am working on. Let me know your feedback.

Power BI Glossary poster

Power BI Glossary

Data Information
Raw data Data as it is received by you
Good data Information in a table form
Bad data Data which is not good
Table Good data with a name
Summarization Roll up or combine raw data into smaller, easier to grasp information
Analysis Finding all possible useful things from the data
Pivot Table Popular tool to summarize tables and analyse the information
Report A way of sharing results of analysis
Action Using the analysis to eliminate bad things or increase good things in future
Power BI Set of new tools which allow even more, faster and easier analysis
Power BI Desktop Windows application which helps in gathering data, cleaning and analysis
Visualization Showing data using a graphic rather than just numbers and text
Dashboard Multiple, related visualizations shown together
Interactive Dashboard Dashboard where changes to one item affects the related visualizations
Power BI Portal The place on internet where you can publish and share the analysis
Power BI app A mobile app for viewing and interacting with Dashboards

2 thoughts on “Power BI Glossary in plain English”

  1. Sounds good, but for lots of us who are just beginning to understand BI perhaps starting explaining what BI stands for and why we need it. Keep up the good work. Is PBI currently free with a office365 subscription. Glossary terms are OK! What are alternatives to power bi.

    1. Thank you for sharing your thoughts. Yes. Power BI has many things going on under a common brand name. It is free with Office 365 subscription. I am not planning to create comparative content of alternatives. Of course there are other products. The difference is, any other product, good or bad, will never land on each user’s desktop. Excel is already there. That is why, real commoditization can be achieved using Excel based BI. Power BI desktop removes dependence upon Excel itself. Which is another good step. Having said that, in spite of the current popularity of Power BI amongst the enthusiasts, geeks, techies and data analytics community, the real benefit will not be delivered till it remains a niche skill. It should become as common as copy paste. That is the idea.

      This glossary is just a start. I am working on a Power BI Desktop based course which can be understood by any user, without any pre-requisite knowledge of any kind (neither Excel, nor statistics or analytics).

      Dr. Nitin

Comments? Suggestions? Wish list?